Honda EV-N Concept: An All-Electric Throwback

It looks just like a Honda from the 1960s, but the EV-N concept's tech is totally naughties

Honda EV-N Concept: An All-Electric Throwback
Honda says it will unveil its EV-N concept, an electric car that hints at the company's 1960's-era N360 microcar, at the Tokyo motor show this month. The four seater showcases Honda tech like a a solar panel roof, door-mounted personal mobility devices and the company's latest vehicle-to-vehicle technology that allows the EV-N to communicate with other vehicles on the road.Honda

The Honda N360 microcar was a modern marvel, sporting an all-alloy engine that could rev to 9000 rpm. The 360 cc unit only topped out at 45 hp, but at 1,100 pounds, the N360 could hit an astounding 81 mph. And that came in handy while sharing the highways of 1970 with Buicks the size of a Japanese prefecture. Now, Honda's recast the classic N360's iconic design as a thoroughly modern concept car, the EV-N. Though just as tiny, this concept was created with some of the company's latest e-tech.

The all-electric EV-N gets power from lithium-ion batteries that can take a charge by way of rooftop solar panels. It may not ever see production, but the EV-N does showcase a series of electronic-based technologies Honda's displaying at the Tokyo motor show under the umbrella term HELLO!, for Honda Electric mobility Loop. According to a press release, those include products that supply electricity, vehicles that run on electricity and products with innovative electronic technologies. HELLO! includes the company's EV-Cub electric motorcycle, a one wheel personal mobility device dubbed U3-X, that uses balance-control tech developed as part of Honda's ASIMO robot project, and LOOP, a portable communication tool that allows people and mobility devices to communicate with each other -- something others call V2V, or vehicle-to-vehicle communications.

As with most styling concepts, Honda says it has no plans to build the EV-N, or even a car that looks like it. But those looking to recapture the early days of Japanese economy-car ownership in the US may want to start lobbying the company now.