Dubuc Tomahawk Electric Supercar Set for 2017

Another small-batch EV startup is staking a claim on the future of driving

Dubuc Tomahawk

Dubuc Tomahawk

Dubuc Motors

The year 2016 is starting to feel a bit like 1916, given the number of new, niche car companies that are popping up. Tesla did it, so why can't everyone? Companies like Arcimoto, Elio, Jannarelly, and Faraday Future are all inching ever closer to production models built outside the traditional automotive manufacturing system. Now we can add Dubuc Motors to that list.

Dubuc is set to make a four-seat all-electric supercar called the Tomahawk in North America. Its rounded, sporty design is noted for being an “American look,” and it’s got scissor doors for maximum super car cred. Dubuc engineers are aiming for a 160 mph top speed, a 0-60 mph time of about 3 seconds, and a range of 300 miles or so.

There’s not much power train detail on the web site, though we do know that there will be two electric motors, one front and one rear, giving it a sporty all-wheel drive function. The Dubuc Tomahawk also has a flat undercarriage, which suggests that the batteries will be arranged under the floor for improved front-rear balance.

The car is already making appearances at auto shows, and the very interested can either put down a $5000 deposit to own a Tomahawk when it rolls off the line in 2017, or they can reserve stock in the company itself. The total price of the car will be $110,000, putting it in the price range of the now-defunct Tesla Roadster.

Speaking of Tesla, Dubuc is calling the Tomahawk "the first long range, luxury, electric vehicle that was designed and engineered for sports car lovers." The Tesla Roadster of 2007, for comparison, had a top speed of 130 mph and a range of about 250 miles. The current Model S P85D can do 0-60 mph in 2.8 seconds in Ludicrous mode and has four seats and all-wheel drive.

The Tomahawk’s design screams supercar, and its numbers push the envelope in the right direction toward longer range and more fun driving dynamics, but it’s hard to be first in what is becoming a crowded field.