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Published Jun 20, 2022 1:00 PM

A good computer monitor is an absolute necessity. After all, it’s your window to the world. Everything you do on your computer will happen through your monitor—whether that be work, web surfing, gaming, or streaming content—so it may as well as be as good as you can afford. “Good” here certainly includes size (we all like to have a lot of real estate at our disposal), but it also includes things like refresh rate, contrast, color, ergonomics, and useful extras. In a word, get the biggest and best that your budget and workspace allow. Your digital life will thank you for it. And if you’re in the market for the most bang for your buck, consider the best HP monitors.

There are quite a few monitor manufacturers to choose from. Hewlett-Packard—better known as HP—makes office equipment, computers, and computer peripherals, including a wealth of solid choices for your next monitor. With more than 80 years of experience, this American manufacturer knows what it’s doing and many of the company’s screens are of both high-quality and affordable. One caveat: given HP’s history as a business-focused provider, many of its monitors are aimed at work rather than play, but that’s not to say that the company doesn’t have gamers covered too, as we’ll see in this list.

How we picked the best HP monitors

As a freelance writer and computer-based musician who works from home, I spend a lot of time looking at a monitor. And my monitor of choice happens to be an HP. To arrive at this, I spent a lot of time researching monitors from other companies, as well as those of HP. It seemed the natural choice for my budget and I’ve been nothing but pleased with my purchase. To arrive at the screens on this list, I used a similar selection process, looking at features, specifications, and prices of a number of units, then comparing them to expert analysis from peers, trusted consumer product reviewers, as well as user impressions.

Things to consider when shopping for the best HP monitors

With such a wide variety of monitor types, it can be hard to know where to start. The first thing you’ll want to consider is size. Monitors come in a number of different sizes (measured diagonally across the screen, of course). Bigger is probably better but there’s also the matter of desktop real estate. A small corner desk will require a monitor with very different dimensions than, say, a wide table. You’ll also want to keep in mind how you plan to use your new screen. A monitor geared toward remote work will have a number of features that you may not need if your intended use is for streaming content or gaming. Connectivity is another matter to examine. What kinds of ports do you need? Once you’ve settled this, you’ll find your options narrowing down to a few strong candidates.

What makes up a monitor?

Not every monitor is the same. Even ones of the same screen width could have very different specifications. There’s size, of course, but there’s also resolution. A nice, wide monitor may give you the space you need but it won’t look good without a high-enough resolution to do it justice. A good resolution will give you both clarity of image and more space to spread out your work. Another aspect of monitors is refresh rate—how many times per second the display is able to redraw images. This is important when it comes to motion—streaming video and games, especially. For non-gaming monitors, a 60Hz refresh rate is standard but faster rates will give you smoother results.

Not every monitor is made of the same stuff. There are three main types of display panel used in modern monitors. They are IPS (In-Plane Switching), TN (Twisted Nematic), and VA (Vertical Alignment). They all have different plusses. IPS is the most common and offers a solid balance of features. TN monitors tend to be more affordable and provide a slightly better response time. Lastly, VA monitors excel at contrast and black levels but can lag when it comes to response time.

Display resolution

Resolution refers to how many pixels a monitor can display in terms of width and height. The more pixels crammed into a display, the sharper the image will be. There are resolution standards, with HP often referring to these standards with acronyms. HD (also known as 720p) has a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels. The next up on the list is Full HD, or FHD (also known as 1080p). This has a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels. Continuing up, there’s WUXGA (widescreen ultra extended graphics array) with a resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels. Next is QHD (quad high definition) with 2560 x 1440 resolution. This has four times the resolution of standard definition; it’s also sometimes referred to as 2K. After that is Ultra HD (or UHD) with 3840 x 2160 pixels. This is also known as 4K. The current top level is 5K with 5120 x 2880 pixels found in specialty (read very expensive) models, such as Apple’s Studio Display.

Connectivity

There are a number of different kinds of ports that you can find on monitors. The most common is HDMI but there are actually four different HDMI cable types. HDMI standard can handle resolutions up to 1080p; HDMI High Speed is for 4K resolution; HDMI Premium High Speed will work with HDR-enabled devices; and HDMI Ultra High Speed (made to meet the HDMI 2.1 standard) is what you’ll need if you require support for uncompressed 8K video and 48 Gbps bandwidth.

Launched in 2008, DisplayPort is a newer standard and is often used for gaming or video editing. There are three types of DisplayPort cables. DisplayPort 1.2 is for monitors with a resolution of up to 3840 x 2160 (UHD 4K) with a 60Hz refresh rate. DisplayPort 1.3 handles 8K video at a 30Hz refresh rate, while DisplayPort 1.4 is for 8K video at 60Hz and HDR video.

Another connection type is USB-C. For modern machines, this is the preferred way to connect laptops to external monitors. You may also encounter regular USB ports on some monitors as well. Meanwhile, two older types you may see are DVI and VGA.

The best HP monitors: Reviews & Recommendations

Our recommendations for the best HP monitors cover the gamut from business machines to gaming displays, with a number of different sizes and resolutions available, and with prices that range from budget-conscious to high-limit credit card level. There’s also a variety of connectivity on hand. Grab your monitor shopping list and start ticking off those boxes.

Best overall: HP Pavilion 32 QHD 32-Inch Display

Why it made the cut: Beautiful and true colors, plus generous screen size, make this the perfect monitor for general use cases.

Specs

  • Size: 32-inch
  • Resolution: 2560 x 1440
  • Refresh rate: 60Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 1.4 I/O, DisplayPort 1.2 (1), DisplayPort 1.4 (1), USB-C (1), USB 3.0 (2)
  • Panel type: VA

Pros

  • Excellent image quality
  • QHD resolution
  • FreeSync support
  • Mini joystick controller

Cons

  • No height or swivel adjustment
  • No built-in speakers

You’re not a specialist in any one area. You just need a monitor that will perform well across the board. If this is you, look no further than HP’s Pavilion 32 QHD 32-Inch Display. As the name suggests, it has a 32-inch screen, which is plenty of real estate for whatever you need to do, whether that be work, video editing, gaming or streaming. The QHD 2560 x 1440 resolution and 92 pixels per inch density are acceptable for general home use. With its VA panel type, it’s particularly well-suited to video and photos, with excellent colors and sRGB—Standard Red Green Blue, the main color space used by monitor manufacturers—representation. The casual gamer will enjoy the AMD FreeSync support, which ensures that there’s no image tearing as a result of incompatible frame rates. However, the 60Hz refresh rate could be a turn-off for hardcore gamers (don’t worry, we’ve got you covered later in this list). Plenty of connectivity and a joystick-based navigation system round out the package. At around $250 street, it’s also extremely affordable.

Best 27-inch: HP E27m G4 QHD USB-C Conferencing Monitor

Why it made the cut: This Zoom-certified business monitor has all the extras you need for video conferencing and remote work, plus impressive color and brightness.

Specs

  • Size: 27-inch
  • Resolution: 2560 x 1440
  • Refresh rate: 75Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 1.4 (1), DisplayPort 1.2 I/O, USB-c (1), USB 3.1 (4), RJ-45 Ethernet (1)
  • Panel type: ISP

Pros

  • Good sRGB color
  • 5-megapixel webcam
  • Stereo speakers and two microphones
  • Ergonomic stand

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Navigation is fiddly

The rise in remote work/schooling has changed many things, including what we need for “the office.” With more and more people working from home, video conferencing has become de rigueur in business. Enter the conferencing monitor, a new category of business monitor that places video meetings front and center. HP’s E27m G4 QHD USB-C Conferencing Monitor is our pick for the best 27-inch monitor for just this reason. With its built-in pop-up 5-megapixel camera, loud stereo speakers, and dual anti-echo microphones, it excels as a conference facilitator. Throw in easily accessible ports including USB-C, regular USB, and even an Ethernet port (and network management function support) plus plenty of swivel and mounting options, and you’re ready to rock and roll in a business-appropriate manner. It’s even Zoom certified. As a monitor, it’s no slouch, either, with 2560 x 1440 resolution and 108 pixels per inch, solid sRGB color results, and a refresh rate of 75Hz. All of these perks come with a price tag (around $550) but, hey, you can always write it off as a business expense.

Best 24-inch: HP 24mh FHD Monitor

Why it made the cut: A high contrast ratio and superb color response plus a flexible stand push this HP 24-incher out into the limelight.

Specs

  • Size: 23.8-inch
  • Resolution: 1920 x 1080
  • Refresh rate: 75Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 1.4 (1), DisplayPort 1.2 (1), VGA (1)
  • Panel type: IPS

Pros

  • Surprising sRGB response
  • High contrast
  • Ergonomic stand
  • Built-in speakers

Cons

  • Brightness could be better

When you buy a 24-inch monitor, you can’t expect too much. Higher resolution and fancy extras are par for the course with bigger displays but you’re often forced to take what you can get when space is at a premium. Thankfully, there’s very little to sacrifice with HP’s 24mh FHD Monitor. It’s got an excellent sRGB response for a screen this size, plus a very nice contrast ratio. It even boasts a refresh rate of 75Hz, which is good news for those working with video or playing the occasional MMO. Where it really surprises, though, are the extras. With a DisplayPort 1.2 connector, plus HDMI and VGA, it can be used as a second monitor. You can also adjust the height up to 4 inches and even switch to portrait mode. Two 2-watt speakers complete the package.

Best for video editing: HP Z43 42.5-inch 4K UHD Display

Why it made the cut: A massive screen and 350 nits of brightness make this HP’s best for video editing.

Specs

  • Size: 42.5-inch
  • Resolution: 3840 x 2160
  • Refresh rate: 60Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 2.0 (1), DisplayPort 1.2 (1), USB-C (2), USB 3.0 (3)
  • Panel type: IPS

Pros

  • Great big 42.5-inch screen
  • 4K resolution
  • Nice and bright
  • Plenty of connectivity

Cons

  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • No height adjustment

There’s something to be said for a big monitor. Whether you’re working with video, gaming, or just need a lot of space to keep many windows open, a large display can be a wonderful thing. HP’s Z43 Monitor has you covered then. With a 42.5-inch screen, there’s lots of wide open space to get lost in. It’s also 4K with a resolution of 3840 x 2160 and pixel density of 103 PPI. HP rates the brightness at 350 nits, meaning the screen will stay visible even in bright light, and with sRGB coverage of 96%, your photos and videos will translate to other viewing situations reliably. Plus its gray-to-gray response time of 8ms will ensure little to no ghosting in movies. The 60Hz refresh rate could be better, and height adjustment to go along with the tilt and swivel functions wouldn’t hurt, but if you’re set on an HP to expand on a laptop for video editing setup, the Z43 should be on your list.

Best 4K: HP Z27k G3 4K USB-C Display

Why it made the cut: A wealth of productivity options bolster the specs on HP’s Z27k G3 4K display.

Specs

  • Size: 27-inch
  • Resolution: 3840 x 2160
  • Refresh rate: 60Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 2.0 (1), DisplayPort 1.4 I/O, USB-C (1), USB 3.2 (4), RJ45 Ethernet (1)
  • Panel type: IPS

Pros

  • Impressive colors
  • Solid contrast
  • USB-C port can deliver 100 watts of power
  • Ergonomic stand

Cons

  • Pricey

When it’s time to get down to work, you need a monitor that will do more than just not get in your way. You want a display that will work with you and hopefully do it in 4K. You’re in luck, as HP’s Z27k G3 4K Display is just that productivity monitor. The specs start with UHD 3840 x 2160 resolution—given that it’s a 27-inch monitor, that puts the pixel density at a luxurious 163 PPI. Higher density means sharper images, and that’s just what you get here, crisp enough even for small text and images. Color is superb, as is contrast, with enough brightness (350 nit) for most situations. The productivity side comes into play with the docking station, with tons of connectivity including USB-C that charges at a hot 100 watts—that is, if you’re using an HP laptop. Otherwise, it’s 65 watts. The stand is suitably ergonomic as well, and the panel can be pivoted to vertical (portrait) mode if need be. While it’s a little on the pricey side compared to other models with similar specs, this display is certainly impressive in all the right places.

Best gaming monitor: HP OMEN 27c Monitor

Why it made the cut: A blisteringly fast refresh rate and aggressively curved monitor make HP’s gaming monitor a solid contender.

Specs

  • Size: 27-inch
  • Resolution: 2560 x 1440
  • Refresh rate: 240Hz
  • Ports: HDMI 2.0 (1), DisplayPort 1.4 (1), USB-C (1), USB 3.2 (2)
  • Panel type: VA

Pros

  • Super fast 240Hz refresh rate
  • 1000R curvature
  • Strong color accuracy
  • FreeSync support

Cons

  • Visual artifacts from VA display

HP has built its reputation on business-focused devices and peripherals. You don’t often think of the company when it comes to gaming. That’s changing, though, and HP’s OMEN 27c Monitor is proof of that. A strong gaming monitor at a more than reasonable price, it’s not perfect but it does excel in a few key areas. The first you’ll notice before you even turn it on. With a curvature of 1000R, it draws your field of view naturally into the gameplay, helping to create an immersive experience and avoid repetitive stress on your neck. The other selling point is the refresh rate. At 240Hz (one of our favorite specs for a top-notch gaming monitor) it’s quite zippy, resulting in butter-smooth motion. As with the other HP monitors on this list, the color response is also superb—throw in a high contrast ratio and plenty of brightness, and you’re set for a long night of gaming. It’s not perfect, though. There are occasional visual artifacts as a result of the VA response time, and the display’s HDR implementation could be better, but if gaming is your thing, it could be just the golden ticket.

Best budget: HP VH240a 23.8-inch 1080p IPS LED Monitor

Why it made the cut: A grip of extras plus solid colors and contrast lift this budget monitor above its price point.

Specs

  • Size: 23.8-inch
  • Resolution: 1920 x 1080
  • Refresh rate: 60Hz
  • Ports: HDMI (1), VGA (1)
  • Panel type: IPS

Pros

  • Impressive colors for the price
  • High contrast
  • Ergonomic stand
  • Stereo 2-watt speakers

Cons

  • Lacking in connectivity

While there’s a lot to be said for a monitor that can do it all, sometimes all you need is a monitor to show you what’s on your computer screen. Extensive connectivity, gaming extras, web cameras—these are all unnecessary. If this is your concern, or you’re on a budget and just need a monitor that will get the job done, HP’s VH240a Monitor is the one for you. With a 23.8-inch IPS screen and a 60Hz refresh rate, it’s more than capable of handling day-to-day computing tasks. It has HP’s solid color numbers, with a nice, high contrast ratio that’s impressive at the sub-$200 price point. Surprisingly, it also boasts a highly ergonomic stand that can pivot to portrait mode, making it a good candidate for a second screen. It even has stereo speakers, a bonus for a monitor of this price. While it may be lacking in connectivity, it has plenty else to recommend it.

FAQs

Q: Are HP monitors flicker-free?

We spend a lot of time looking at monitors. That’s why we want to make sure that they’re as easy on the eyes as can be. One issue that some monitors can have is flicker, or extremely rapid cycling of light. This can be visible or invisible but even the invisible kind can be tiring on your eyes. Flicker can be caused by a number of things. For older monitors, the likely culprit is PWM, or pulse width modulation. To reduce the screen’s brightness, PWM turns the monitor’s backlight off and on at a very high rate. This can cause eye strain over long periods of viewing. Thankfully, most modern monitors—including HP monitors—are what is called Flicker-Free, meaning they employ DC (or direct current) modulation to maintain brightness at a constant level.

Q: Are HP monitors made in China?

As with many modern technological products, HP monitors are manufactured in China. The company uses a number of different production outfits in China to manufacture its monitors, including Hon Hai Precision Industry Company Ltd, Qisda, TPV Technology Limited, and Wistron. Other companies that also employ these factories are BOE, AU Optronics Corporation, and LG Display. However, Hewlett-Packard (to use the company’s full name) remains an American company headquartered in Palo Alto, Calif.

Q: How often should you replace your HP monitor?

There are a number of reasons why you might want to replace your HP monitor. Perhaps you’ve changed the way you work (moving from the office to a remote work situation, for example) and need more of the extras that come with a conferencing monitor. The same could apply to a change in hobby or lifestyle. If you’re devoting increasingly more time to gaming, it makes sense to up your game with a new and full-featured gaming monitor. Or perhaps you’d just like better resolution or a more dense pixel count. These are all valid reasons to replace your monitor. There are also technical limits to displays. HP monitors, like all monitors, have a backlight with a finite lifespan. Once that source of luminescence burns out, you’ll have no choice but to replace your monitor. Other technical issues include monitor burn-in, dead pixels, or even mechanical issues like a bad power supply. All things considered, a monitor should last between five and 10 years.

A final word on selecting the best HP monitors

Hewlett-Packard has been in the business for a long time. The company brings all of that experience to bear on its products, monitors included, so HP’s screens should always be considered when making the decision to buy a new one. While HP does lean toward business-focused screens, there are plenty of other types available, and often at very reasonable prices. With the right research and a category-focused approach, you’ll be able to select the best HP monitor that will hopefully complement your computing needs.

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