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Does a bear poop in the woods? Yes. Sometimes, it even does it right in front of a camera.

In his new book, Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, out this month, Roland Kays takes us inside the world of camera traps, compiling over 600 photographs from camera traps set up by individuals and research groups around the world. Kays, as the director of the Biodiversity Laboratory at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, knows how important camera traps are for researchers trying to keep track of elusive wildlife populations.

Camera traps can help researchers and citizen scientists monitor populations in the Serengeti, capture evidence of endangered creatures, and count penguins from a distance.

They can also capture some silly, unguarded moments. We’ve selected 10 of the more amusing photos from the book.

Surprised cougar
Surprised cougar Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature TEAM Network and the Brazilian National Institute for Amazonian Research

This cougar, out for a mid-morning stroll in Brazil, was not ready for its close-up.

'Hey, how's it going?'
‘Hey, how’s it going?’ Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature eMammal

A bear looks super cool casually leaning against a tree. He’s probably just trying to scope out the woods.

I have come to suck your blood
I have come to suck your blood Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature Helen Esser, Yorick Liefting, Patrick Jansen/Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

A vampire bat grabs a bite on the rear end of a sleeping cow. Vampire bats use cattle as a main source of food, much to the annoyance of local ranchers in Panama, where this photo was taken.

It's a wolf eat stick world
It’s a wolf eat stick world Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature Parks Canada/Banff National Park

A young wolf carries a stick back towards the den.

Say what now?
Say what now? Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature Benoit Goossens

These jaded long-tailed macaques aren’t startled by the camera trap so much as suspicious. Many macaque populations are used to humans and their technology, and are known for begging for handouts at tourist sites.

The Owl and The Pussycat
The Owl and The Pussycat Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature Roland Kays

An owl snatches a cat from the ground, not knowing that the cat is actually a robot. Researchers found the robocat nearby, relatively unscathed.

'Hi, I hear you're taking pictures?'
‘Hi, I hear you’re taking pictures?’ Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature TEAM Network/ Nouabale Ndoki National Park

A curious gorilla smiles for the camera in the Republic of the Congo.

I...uhh...what?
I…uhh…what? Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature TEAM Network, Central Suriname site

A Jaguarundi, a kind of cat, is totally dumbfounded by this camera set up in Suriname.

No one expects the flying squirrel
No one expects the flying squirrel Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature Hailey & Logan Lehrer

All this poor deer was trying to do was eat some apples as a nighttime snack. It was hungry, ok? But then, out of nowhere, a flying squirrel decides to photobomb the moment, and a camera flash only adds to the mayhem. Run away, little deer, run away.

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