Just How Fat Are We?

Headlines fret about the growing obesity epidemic, but what does it mean? How did it happen? And what are the costs? Illustrations by XPLANE
After a quarter-century rise, obesity prevalence has not increased since 2004. Still, 72 million adults (34%) are obese. Efforts are under way to reduce this to 15%, a level not seen since 1980.

OBESITY IN AMERICA

** State Lines**

Obesity, defined as a body-mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, is not equally distributed across the U.S. Check out this map to find out which state is the fattest (hint: it’s the namesake of mud pie), which is the thinnest (think Coors Light), and which spends the most money on obesity-related health care (its governor pumps iron).

Read on, after the break, for more of America’s (and the world’s) fat facts.

COUNTING THE CALORIES

THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD

THE PERSONAL COST OF FAT

Trouble at Work

Obese workers cost employees more in medical, disability, and workers’-compensation claims.