Three Projects That Reinvent Breakfast

Jazz up the most important meal of the day

Cereal Hacks
In March 2015, artist and inventor Dominic Wilcox got an offer he couldn't refuse. Kellogg's wanted him to create five goofy devices to liven up cereal. Wilcox dreamed up 20. He eventually built seven, including a cereal-serving drone, a spoon with LED eyes, a "tummy rumbling amplifier," and a head-mounted crane for scooping cereal. The latter, which appeared on The Late Show, uses three levers to control the crane's motion and a fourth to release milk. "The way it moves looks robotic," Wilcox says, "but it's powered by hydraulics."Illustration by Chris Philpot

It’s hard to get excited about a meal that takes place when you’re half-asleep. To get the day started right, these makers have invented machines that shake up breakfast. Their outlandish appliances might not end up on your table, but they’ll certainly whet your DIY appetite.

Bacon Alarm Clock

Bacon Alarm Clock

Traditional alarm clocks wake you with annoying beeps. Tech entrepreneur Matty Sallin decided to make mornings more pleasant—with a bacon-scented alarm clock. "You probably have a memory of waking up to the smell of breakfast," Sallin says. "It's a completely effective alarm." With help from friends, including engineer Josh Myer, he built a pig-shaped device. Partially inspired by the Easy-Bake oven, it uses two halogen lights to heat up precooked bacon in about 10 minutes. Once he's awake, Sallin simply eats breakfast in bed.Illustration by Chris Philpot
Waffle-Making Robot

Waffle-Making Robot

Jon Eivind Stranden, a Norwegian electrical-engineering student, created the WaffleBot to help cook breakfast when he has guests. "It solves the problem of having to constantly fill and empty the waffle iron," he says. "You just select how many waffles you want, and it does the rest." At the heart of the WaffleBot is a waffle iron, opened and closed by a motor on a wire, and a custom valve that releases the batter. After a set cooking time, the iron rotates upside down and automatically falls open, releasing a waffle onto a waiting plate.Illustration by Chris Philpot

This article was originally published in the May/June 2016 issue of Popular Science, under the title "Three Projects That Reinvent Breakfast."