Photos From 11 Of The World's Coolest Nuclear-Monitoring Stations

How the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization keeps an ear to the ground

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization recorded some of the first data indicating both the recent Russian meteor hit and the North Korean nuclear test. How'd it know so fast? The organization maintains 337 seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide monitoring stations all over the world, to catch when someone sets off a nuclear explosion. Although built to monitor nuclear activity, the stations also gather data that can be used for tsunami warnings and for studies about volcanoes, climate change, whale migrations and other science, the organization says. What follows are photos of some of the stations' coolest locales.

PHOTO GALLERY:

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TOWNSVILLE, AUSTRALIA
Radionuclide stations sample the atmosphere for radioactive particles. They're the only stations that confirm whether an explosion detected by other means was actually nuclear. Here, experts examine a radionuclide station in northern Australia.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
NOUAKCHOTT, MAURITANIA
Radionuclide station RN43 caught in a sandstormCopyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
KAMTSCHATKA, RUSSIA
The view from radionuclide station RN60Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
ASCENSION, U.K.
Infrasound stations, like this one in the British South Atlantic, look for sound waves that are emitted by large explosions, but are too low-frequency for the human ear to detect.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
SO THAT'S WHAT THEY WERE DOING THIS WHOLE TIME
Just kidding. There is an infrasound station on Easter Island, but we are not aware of it being connected to the statues there in any way. This photo was taken near the station.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
WINDLESS BIGHT, ANTARCTICA
Infrasound station IS55 gets a checkup.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
TORODI, NIGER
Seismic stations, like this one, measure shockwaves in the Earth. Most of the time, they end up picking up earthquakes, but underground nuclear tests, such as those set off by North Korea, also create shockwaves.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
BILIBINO, RUSSIA
A seismic station in far northeastern RussiaCopyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
WAKE ISLAND, U.S.
A hydroacoustic cable extends into the sea off of U.S.-owned Wake Island, west of Hawaii. Hydroacoustic stations listen for sounds from explosions, which travel especially far underwaterCopyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
CROZET ISLANDS, FRANCE
A hydroacoustic station geting installed, in 2000, offshore of the French-owned Crozet Islands in the southern Indian Ocean.Copyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission
PALMER STATION, ANTARCTICA
On the way to check a radionuclide station in AntarcticaCopyright CTBTO Preparatory Commission