Obesity Weighs Heavily on Airlines

The Federal Aviation Administration has finally revised its 66-year-old assumptions about U.S. passenger weight. Here are a few reasons why

8.5 Pounds the average U.S. adult male weight increased, 1991 to 2000

170 Pounds the FAA assumed an average male passenger weighed,
1938 to 2003

184 Pounds the FAA currently expects an average male passenger to weigh, according to an August 2004 revision of weight assumptions

14.8 billion Gallons of jet fuel consumed by domestic air travel in 2000

350 million Gallons that could have been spared in 2000 if the average
U.S. adult weight remained at 1991 average

3.8 million Tons of carbon dioxide emissions generated by burning
350 million gallons of jet fuel

$275 million Cost of 350 million gallons of jet fuel in 2000

23.5 million Additional gallons of fuel required if every domestic-flight passenger in 2000 was served the Hardee´s 2/3-pound Monster Thickburger en route

Sources: Bureau of Transportation Statistics; U.S. Department of Transportation; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
Federal Aviation Administration; Hardee´s Food Systems; National Academy of Sciences; National Research Council