Ice Halos, Cheeky Hamsters, And Other Amazing Images Of The Week

Plus, science sushi. Yum!

Winter Wonderment

A photographer in Red River, New Mexico, captured this set of rainbow-like ice halos. They are caused when light runs into ice crystals in the atmosphere.Joshua Thomas via US National Weather Service Amarillo Texas

Cheeky Hamster

BBC released a clip this week of a hamster chowing down on some comically large nuts. This X-ray shows how the hamster's cheeks balloon as it packs in the food.YouTube

Teeny Tiny

General Electric has made it possible to see some of the tiniest things on Earth and capture it. With its Cytell machine, scientists can image and analyze cells in one device. Here’s the cross section of a pine needle.GE Reports

A Really Long Pier

At four miles long, this pier that juts out into the Gulf of Mexico from Progreso, Mexico is one of the longest in the world. The Landsat 8 satellite captured this image back in November.NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen

Down In Flames

The SpaceX rocket crashed onto its landing pad last weekend. On Friday, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk released a set of pictures, including this one, of the rather disastrous attempted landing.Elon Musk via Twitter

Artsy Math

Math, as it turns out, can be astonishingly beautiful. Edmund Harriss, a mathematics professor at the University of Arkansas came up with this new spiral using the golden ratio, which is 1.618.Edmund Harriss

Shifting River

As seen from the International Space Station, the Parana River has had a lot of shifts in its history. The brown parts of the river show where the most muddy sediment is and where the river slowly moves as it forms new paths.NASA Earth Observatory

Scientific Sushi

An artist in Japan has been drawing pictures in her sushi, including some scientific images. The cool thing with sushi art is that there's no way to tell what it will look like until it's sliced up. io9 lists some of their favorite science-inspired sushi here.Takayo "Tama-cha" Kiyota

Diaper-Aided Discovery

Baby diapers are helping scientists get clearer microscope images. This one, of a mouse's brain, was helped along by a polymer found in diapers that expands along with cells when it touches water, making the cells' features easier to see.Fei Chen, Paul Tillberg, Ed Boyden at MIT

Shark Tooth Saw

A power saw made with shark teeth prepares to cut through salmon. See the whole video here.Katherine Corn, Cornell University