The Future Then: "Homemade Kicks"

And the law allows you to use them if you don't show any after effects

In December 1920, feeling the agony of Prohibition, the Popular Science editors -- as resourceful then as now -- put together this handy list of alternate ways to get sauced. None of them seem wholly pleasant, but with alcohol off the table, necessity is the mother of invention.

Homemade Kicks

If you tell a little boy not to get his feet wet, he'll run for the nearest puddle. Grown-ups are just the same: many people who never drank beer and wine now do a rushing brewery business in their own kitchens

A Glass of Near-Beer

A glass of near-beer -- that's what the man above ordered. And when he got it, he poured twenty-five drops of tabasco sauce into it. The beer came to life -- and so did he

Lemon Extract (about 170 proof)

That bottle of lemon extract has unlimited possibilities. Empty it out, except for a teaspoonful, and then fill it up with near-beer. See if you don't get a shock

Snuff

Snuff is in vogue once more. If you chew some until it becomes a soft paste, and keep it under your lip, you will soon feel as you did when you drank wine like water

Easy Fermentation

Wines may be made at home, provided they are kickless. Here's a recipe: boil ten pounds of ripe dates forty-eight hours, put the juice in jars, and bury the jars for twelve days. Then see what happens

Cider

If you run apples through a chopper, strain the juice, let it stand till it ferments, and then drink it, you will suffer more pleasure than pain. It's against the law

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