Dynamite Dissection: Computer Box

What's inside a computer box? Pixies? Magic dust?

Do you ever wonder how you can simultaneously prevent identity theft and learn more about computers? Sure, we all do.

It's time for another Dynamite Dissection.

[Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]

Dynamite Dissection PC Eruption

We demanded that this computer reveal its secrets, in the name of Science! In this photo gallery, we'll look at what was inside. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissection PC Cover

This was the computer's enclosure, now bent over backwards. It landed alarmingly close to where we were standing, performing our scientific observations. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissection PC Hard Drive

This is the hard drive. The magnetic platters once contained user and system data for this PC. We have protected that data from being used for identity theft. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissection PC CD-ROM

This was the CD-ROM drive. As the case was crushed in, the guts were driven out the front. Some of the gears which spun the platter or moved the tray can be seen trying to escape the blast. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissections PC Cards

In the foreground, we see the power supply and one of the drive-power connectors. In the background, the PCI cards (accessory cards for things like Ethernet adapters and display drivers) are shown where they landed after having been abruptly removed from the communications bus on the motherboard. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissection PC RAM

One RAM chip, removed from its slot on the motherboard and nestled amongst a web of drive data cables. [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall

Dynamite Dissection PC Drive Cable

One drive cable, which would have carried data between a bus on the motherboard and a drive, escaped the fray. (And seems to have landed in a pile of television bits.) [Note: No dynamite was used in this Dynamite Dissection. Do not attempt to do anything like this on your own.]Vin Marshall