A Tech-Stuffed Turkey Day

The Pilgrims had friendly natives to help celebrate the harvest - you've got PopSci

Thanksgiving may be the country´s oldest celebration, but that´s no reason to cook with 17th-century tech. Whereas early settlers cooked over open fires, we have smart ovens that automatically adjust to what´s inside them, thermometers that read surface temperature with infrared radiation, knives with molecular structures that keep them sharp longer, and a meat grinder as powerful as a small car engine. Give thanks for technology.

DuPont Self-Charging Smoke Alarm

When this smoke alarm-which screws in between a lightbulb and fixture to constantly charge itself from the socket-lets you know the yams went a bit beyond â€candied,†simply flip the light switch three times to shut it up. ** $40; dupont.com**DuPont

J.A. Henckels Twin Pro-S 8" Bread Knife

Believe it or not, slicing bread can dull a knife. But this one will stay sharp a lot longer. Its serrated blade is coated in a layer of high-carbon steel electrolyzed to make the molecules harder, so it will keep its edge through dozens of loaves. ** $100; jahenckels.com**Satoshi

Chef's Laser Probe Combo Thermometer

Avoid poisoning loved ones with undercooked turkey (target: 180F). This probe uses a lab-grade sensor to see the temperature inside and an infrared scanner for checking a pan´s surface temp so you saut-not burn-the carrots. $100; bonjourproducts.comSatoshi

Chef's Choice Model 750 Meat Grinder

Turn any meat-even lean, gamey venison-into sausage for making stuffing with this belt-driven meat grinder. It´s the most powerful consumer model available, cranking out 24 pound-feet of torque (on par with a 1955 VW Beetle). ** $500; chefschoice.com**Satoshi

Miele Masterchef Oven

Tell this dual oven what kind of meat you´re cooking and insert the built-in temperature probe, and it will automatically set the temperature and time and shut off so the meat can rest before it´s served. It will even blast your bird with intense heat to give it that crispy skin worth fighting Uncle Jim for. $5,000; miele.comCourtesy Miele