Lean, Mean Driving Machine

One part automobile, one part motorcycle. Stir. Then get out of the way.

by www.carver.nl

www.carver.nl

The Vandenbrink Carver is a crossover vehicle of a different sort: Its enclosed cabin is reminiscent of a car's (specifically, the New Beetle's), but it seats just two-a driver and a petite passenger-in tandem like a motorcycle. It leans into turns (motorcycle), a motion controlled by the steering wheel and not the weight of a driver (car). Its three wheels split the difference.

Key to the Carver's tilt is something called Dynamic Vehicle Control. The system senses speed and road conditions, then adjusts the lean of the front wheel and body (up to 45 degrees) to optimize balance in corners. Is 660cc 65-horsepower engine pushes it to 60 mph in 8 seconds, with a 118-mph top speed.

The Carver is certified as a car for European roads. If you don't mind a trip to Vandenbrink's Grauendeel, Netherlands, factory, they'll sell you one for 55 big ones. But be warned: Since the company has no immediate plans to certify it in the United States, this could be the most expensive go-kart you ever buy.