From the Operating Room to the Lake

The technology behind dissolving sutures finds its way into the tackle box

Bioline

Bioline

Even the fishermen are going green. Any angler worth his bait has lost a few lines to the bottom of the fishing pond. And, chances are the line he lost is still lying there with those of his ancestors, damaging coral and killing fish. Traditional nylon lines can take up to 600 years to disappear, but with Bioline, a new "biofilament" line developed by alumni of the med-tech industry, that time can be cut to just five years. That's fishing technology even the fish will embrace.

The lines come sealed in packages with a five-year shelf life. Once on the pole, the line lasts 10-12 months without any reduction in strength. The product is available in 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-pound tests in 210-yard spools ($16) with larger sizes in the works. It looks, feels, and performs like a standard line. Along with the environmental benefits, Bioline claims excellent knot strength and abrasion resistance. Unlike standard monofilaments, Bioline doesn't absorb water, ensuring that its properties remain the same during a long day of fishing.

The technology behind Bioline was first applied to absorbable sutures more than twenty years ago. With costs of technology dropping over time, a biodegradable fishing line has finally become financially viable. Developed over four years, Bioline was launched earlier this year, the first of its kind. Next up: the hook?