Gallery: Pratt and Whitney Pure Power Geared Turbofan Engine

Fuel-sipping jet

Pratt and Whitney Pure Power Geared Turbofan Engine Image 1

In most jet engines (more properly called turbofans), the fan that pulls air into the engine is directly linked to the compressor that squeezes that air down for combustion, so they have to turn at the same rate. Not so the in the Pure Power engine pictured here.

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The gears in the Pure Power are placed between the compressor and the fan, which decouples the two, allowing for a more efficient arrangement: a big, slow fan shoving air into a small, fast turbine.

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The result is a shorter, lighter engine that can produce the same amount of power as a larger conventional turbofan, while burning 12 to 15 percent less fuel and emitting 35 percent less carbon dioxide.

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Pratt & Whitney finished ground- and air-testing of the engine this year, and the first of them will go on the Bombardier C-Series jet starting in 2013

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Detailed rendition of the Pure Power's engine.

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Although smaller than some other engines, the Turbofan Engine still stands taller than these men.

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The engine up close.

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A look at the gears of the Turbofan Engine.