The 10 Best Things From February 2015

Some things are just... better

This article was originally published in the February 2015 issue of Popular Science, under the title "Obsessed."

Pawscout Pet Finder
Pet tags can only help reunite you with your missing pet if someone takes the time to read them. Pawscout Pet Finder tags actively help find wayward pets with an embedded Bluetooth antenna. The tag sends a smartphone alert if Fido wanders too far—and helps home in on his location when he runs away. $30Courtesy Pawscout
Moleskine Smart Notebook
Moleskine and Adobe made a Creative Cloud-connected notebook that syncs digital and hand-drawn art. Scrawl your masterpiece on the page, and capture it with an app that renders it into vectors. $33Courtesy Moleskine
Quirky Outlink
When paired with a Quirky Wink hub, this smart outlet lets users monitor the electricity flowing to devices, turn the outlet on or off, and program schedules. $50Courtesy Quirky
Worx Clamping Sawhorse
Integrating two tools, Worx's new sawhorse has a simple groove that fits two clamps. Hold your projects in place, and fold it all away for storage when you're finished. $59Courtesy Worx
Dyson Cinetic Big Ball Animal
Vacuums are convenient. Changing their bags and filters—not so much. To end that aggravation, Dyson modified its bagless vacuum to make it filterless too. Cinetic has tiny flexible cones that vibrate to capture every particle without clogging. $600Courtesy Dyson
TaylorMade R15 Driver
The new R15 golf club has two sliding weights that can help straighten your shot, and a center of gravity that sits lower and more forward to help increase distance. $429Courtesy Taylormade
Next Glass
Next Glass aims to be Netflix for wine and beer selection. The app learns your preferences—and correlates them to a database of chemical compositions—to make recommendations. Scan a wine label with your smartphone and Next Glass decides whether you're apt to like it ... or not. FreeCourtesy Next Glass
The Man Who Touched His Own Heart
In time for Valentine's Day, Rob Dunn's book tells true tales of the heart—just not the kind you'd expect. In 325 pages, Dunn details broken hearts, transplanted hearts, and the bar-fight beginnings of heart surgery. $27Courtesy Little, Brown and Company
Linkage
Learning genetics can be tough, unless you're doing it with Linkage. The card game challenges players to build the longest strand of RNA, while mutating that of their opponents. It also teaches players how to accurately match DNA and RNA. $18Courtesy Genius Games
Earth: A New Wild
In five episodes, Dr. M. Sanja­yan travels to 29 countries to seek out baby pandas, humpback whales, and other extraordinary wildlife, while exploring the ways humans shape the natural world, and vice versa. Feb. 4 on PBSCourtesy PBS